How Performance Point Keeps Their Employees Happy

How Performance Point Keeps Their Employees Happy 

Written By:  Athena Seay

We all know that the happier your employees are, the more successful your business will be, but how exactly is this achieved?  I had the opportunity to have a one on one with some of Performance Point’s team members Russell Brown, and Scott Forsyth who shared their thoughts on why they are happy, content, and even ecstatic!

Russell has been with the company for over 5 years.  As Operations Manager, Russell’s responsibilities are ever-changing and various.  “That’s ok, that is what is most enjoyable about my job experience here, it’s not the same year after year, the endless monotony of doing the same thing day in and day out. The atmosphere here allows us to be creative, it’s like entrepreneurship without the risk!  Where one person cannot do it by themselves someone else pitches-in and together we solve issues, we’re a team.”

Scott has grown from Field Inspector to Manager of Business Development in the 3 years he has been with Performance Point.  Scott’s strong work ethic and yearning to learn more are supported by the management team.  “I feel we have a safety net, not only from the owner Sam Galphin, but from the whole team.”

And that team is growing!!!  

 This collaborative environment at Performance Point has worked well with their customers too. “We are not afraid to challenge processes or how something is being done.  We look through the lens of how we can make this better for the customer experience,” says Russell.

Russell also appreciates that everyone is recognized for their achievements. Whether it’s a personal call from the owner or a write-up in the newsletter, success is noticed.  

Communication within the organization as well as to our customers is impressive”, says Russell.  “We have a line of communication that allows all of us to talk to each other for support.  Communicating with customers reflects a friendly, warm feel too”.

Both Russell and Scott appreciate the work-life balance at Performance Point. “Yes, while we give it our all during those working hours, nothing is rigid, we are not micro-managed, and that makes life at home happy and fulfilling,” says Scott.  Russell says, he is “challenged but since things are always changing he doesn’t get burned-out”.

So, being a happy employee at Performance Point means being challenged, having the opportunity to grow within the company, having a work-life balance, being surrounded by a supportive team that treats you like family….from the words of Confucius 

“Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life”

19

Oct

COVID Industry News

Industry news has been encouraging, The Washington Post recently wrote: In April, housing starts in the United States on a year-over-year basis declined 29.7 percent to 891,000, according to the Census Bureau. During that same period, housing completions fell 29.7 percent to 891,000. And in April, 1.1 million building permits were filed, down 19.2 percent from the previous April.

Robert Dietz, chief economist at the National Association of Home Builders, anticipates about a 20 percent decline nationally in single-family construction this year “with a rebound taking hold at the end of the year and gains in 2021.”

Specifically, the housing market is beginning to show signs of stabilizing and is moving forward from the pandemic. By mid-May, the latest NAHB-Wells Fargo Housing Market Index, which depicts builder confidence in the construction of single-family houses, increased seven points to 37.

“But being below 50, it is still in negative territory,” Dietz said.

In a research note, Thomas Simons, a money market economist with Bloomfield, N.J.-based investment bank Jefferies & Co., wrote that he’s “optimistic” about the home building sector and that he expects a “sharp rebound” in sentiment in the June data.

“Coming into the COVID-19-induced shutdown of economic activity, there was a housing shortage in the U.S. that was driving prices steadily higher and led this index to reach its highest level since 1999,” Simons wrote. “Despite the massive surge in unemployment caused by the policy response to the virus, we don’t think the fundamentals in the housing market have changed all that much. With most of the job losses either temporary or at the lower end of the income spectrum, they are unlikely to affect the demand for single-family housing.”

But Joel Kan, associate vice president of economic and industry forecasting at the Mortgage Bankers Association, was less rosy. In a recent statement, he said the loss of 1 million construction jobs “may potentially slow the rebound in new construction that will be needed to completely revive the housing market.”

For more go to https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2020/06/11/business-our-new-normal-pandemics-effect-home-construction-market/?arc404=true

Over at Marketwatch.com, the situation is improving: “The numbers: Home-building activity has staged a significant turnaround from the coronavirus-related slowdown.

U.S. homebuilders began construction on homes at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.496 million in July, up 22.6% from the previous month and 23.4% from a year ago, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday. The pace of home building is now 7% down from the pre-coronavirus high.

Permitting activity occurred at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.495 million, up 18.8% from June and 9.4% from July 2019.

The numbers: Home-building activity has staged a significant turnaround from the coronavirus-related slowdown.

U.S. homebuilders began construction on homes at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.496 million in July, up 22.6% from the previous month and 23.4% from a year ago, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday. The pace of home building is now 7% down from the pre-coronavirus high.

Permitting activity occurred at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.495 million, up 18.8% from June and 9.4% from July 2019.

All regions experienced an overall uptick in housing starts despite rising coronavirus cases across many parts of the country, led by the 35.3% increase in the Northeast. However, single-family starts actually fell slightly between June and July in both the Northeast and the Midwest. Permitting rose relatively uniformly across the country, with all four major regions seeing upticks.

Big picture: Americans’ demand for homes was at a fever pitch before the pandemic, and it’s now returned in earnest. Low mortgage rates have made buying a home a more affordable proposition for millions of Americans, while the reality of living, working, and attending school at home has prompted many households to search for bigger properties, particularly in the suburbs.”

For more, go to https://www.marketwatch.com/story/housing-starts-soar-226-in-july-as-americans-head-for-the-suburbs-in-search-of-larger-abodes-2020-08-18

Make no mistake, the pandemic has changed the way we live and work. Galphin offers this: “I hope we as a company will continue to grow in our understanding of our impact on each other from a corporate and individual perspective.  For example, we’ve seen mental health effects and the impact of charity.  We had several employees who suffered serious mental health effects and/or have been impacted by the mental health of loved ones as a result of COVID.  I want to facilitate an environment that fosters mental, spiritual, and physical health.  We did some outreach efforts like making sandwiches for a homeless shelter and I’d like to see those activities continue as partnerships more than just one-time events.  I personally lean pretty far toward the introverted end of the spectrum so I have appreciated the isolation, but I have come to appreciate my face-to-face interactions with customers and co-workers more than I ever thought I would.”